me&my health up

Enhancing Relationships during a Pandemic

November 13, 2020 me&my wellness / Ingrid Galloway Season 1 Episode 31
me&my health up
Enhancing Relationships during a Pandemic
Show Notes Transcript

Since COVID divorce rates have doubled! In this episode of me&my health up, we double down on how to enhance your relationships by interviewing Relationship Coach and Chief Relaxation Officer Ingrid Galloway

Ingrid’s bio

Ingrid is the Founder of Kahyangan® (means: heaven), a wellness clinic in Sydney, Australia. She has been a Relationship Coach for 11 years and a Spa Therapist for 21 years (mainly in Five Star Hotel Day Spas). Over this time Ingrid has looked after thousands of highly stressed clients throughout the world. Her work focuses on stress, relaxation and relationships. She has a kind soul, always seeking to reach out to support the healing process for the many stressed people, broken/lonely hearted singles, stressed out parents and loving couples that cross her path. She does 1-1 coaching sessions, group workshops + retreats for broken/lonely hearted singles and couples.

About me&my Health Up & Host

me&my Health Up seeks to enhance and enlighten the wellbeing of others. Host Anthony Hartcher is the CEO of me&my wellness which provides holistic health solutions using food is medicine, combined with a holistic, balanced, lifestyle approach. Anthony holds three bachelor degrees in Complementary Medicine; Nutrition and Dietetic Medicine; and Chemical Engineering.



Support the show
Anthony Hartcher:

Welcome to another insightful episode of me&my health up. The purpose of this podcast is to enhance and enlighten the well being of others. I'm your host Anthony hacia. I'm a clinical nutritionist and lifestyle medicine specialist. This episode is centred on enhancing relationships with relationship coach and chief relaxation officer, Ingrid Galloway. Ingrid is the founder of Kayangan, which means heaven. It's a wellness clinic based in Sydney, Australia. She has been a relationship coach for 11 years and a spa therapist for 21 years, mainly in five star hotel day spas. So she uses looking after her clients of that are very highly stressed from all over the world. Her work is always focused on stress, relaxation, and relationships. She has a kind soul, always seeking to reach out and support the healing process of stress people broken lonely hearted singles, stressed out parents as well as in loving couples that have crossed her path. She does one to one coaching, group workshops, retreats for the broken and lonely hearted signals, see signal signal people. How am I gonna get that right? And couples? So welcome, Ingrid, how are you today?

Ingrid Galloway:

thank you very much for inviting me here. Looking forward to having a chat with you

Anthony Hartcher:

a delight to have you on and really looking forward to our conversation. So you know, for the sake of the listeners, tell us a little bit about how you've arrived to being a relationship coach?

Ingrid Galloway:

So I moved to Australia by the age of 21, to escape from my mother, and get married to my first husband, not a very good reason to get married, by the way. But I was in love with him. But part of my reason was to escape, because I disagree with you know, some of the upbringing such as, you know, guilt, shame, suppress anger, etc. So I didn't feel home back home. And the only way to actually move out of home is by getting married. So there you go. That's my honest truth. And then, unfortunately, my first marriage, which was 10 years long, it was an abusive relationship. So I left after three attempts. And during my healing process, I went to several self development seminars, I went to see a couple of therapists and I went back to college to study counselling and life coaching. And straightaway, I knew that I would be a coach, not a counsellor, and my niche would be in relationship, because I am passionate and compassionate to help others in similar sort of predicament. So yeah, that's my journey.

Anthony Hartcher:

That's fantastic to hear Ingrid, the, you know, the fact that you've taken your learning experiences, and they are passing you know, your knowledge plus what your further learns, you know, unto others, and to really help them, empower them to hopefully, make one choice in terms of relationship. But if if it's the second choice, you help them in that transition from the first relationship to the second relationship. So really well done. There, Ingrid,

Ingrid Galloway:

there is definitely hope. Well, I'm on to my second marriage now. Well, hopefully the last one. We've been married for 12 years and have two kids. So happiness is possible.

Anthony Hartcher:

Fantastic. So just starting, I guess the topic of Yeah, for those that are looking for their first love. And, you know, if you if you were to reflect back to when you're 16 years old, what, what have you learned over the years? And what would you do differently as a 16 year old, you know, looking for that first love, or maybe it could be a 20 or 30 year old looking for their first real love?

Ingrid Galloway:

Right? Um, that living through your kids is very damaging to your kid's soul or psyche. I mean, this is not necessarily looking for your first love. But you know, when you're younger, and eventually you get into relationship and you eventually have kids, just let yourself know that living through your kids is very damaging to your kid's soul or psyche. And you know, go for your goals and dreams yourself and don't force your kids to do what you want, because you haven't achieved it yet due to your own limitations. And I encourage them to to soar and be the best versions of themselves. So if you're a 16 year old, then you know, go for your life, you know, soar and be the best version of yourself yourselves. Find love, you know, it may not be successful. First time around second time around, it's okay. It's just the learning, you know, date people have fun, definitely have fun, because you know, getting married or getting in a long term relationship, it is a commitment. And sometimes you just need some sort of like, experience before you jump on to the big one.

Anthony Hartcher:

Great tips there Ingrid. And I really like that tip for, you know, when you're thinking about parenthood is not living through your children's lives or your the life that you wanted to live and try to get the kid to reenact that light. Yeah, so really, as you said, to really just focus on obviously raising them, but raising them as free spirits. But continue to work on yourself. And continue to pursue your dreams, make yourself increment, you know, incremental improvements each day. And that, and that, that gives the children something to aspire to, because they can see their parents, making improvements developing themselves and make and it shows that the parents are human, because they'll make mistakes on their journey to towards their dreams. And I think that's, I think a really good tip, because that's really helpful, from a kid's perspective in saying that their parents aren't perfect, their parents have dreams and their parents are pushing the dreams onto the children.

Ingrid Galloway:

There are a lot of helicopter parents nowadays. I noticed that the kids look quite miserable.

Anthony Hartcher:

Great tip there in Ingrid. So from your experience, what do you believe are the key drivers to a successful relationship? Ah,

Ingrid Galloway:

um, I will say, oh, there's so many. But I will pick three C's. So first C is commitment, communication, and compromise. So the three C's, I still remember, you know, like, when I treated this couple for their 60th wedding anniversary in one of the five star hotel, days passed back then I asked them congratulation, you know, 60 years married? That's Yes. You know, what? accomplishment? So what's your secret? And then he said, compromise, increase? It's all about compromise.

Anthony Hartcher:

But I really like it, Ingrid. Because if I look at my first relationship, which failed, you know, I wasn't good at the communication. You know, I was great at the commitment. Yeah, terrific, you know, full full stars for that, or 10 out of 10. But look at the communication, that was not great. And I've learned to be a better communicator over the years, certainly through experience. And, you know, if I look at the compromise side of things probably wasn't the best in the first relationship in relation to compromise. And if I, you know, look at myself today, from what I've learned out of that first relate, you know, first relationship was still great with the commitment side of things, I've give myself a 10 out of 10, certainly improving on the communication and way better than ever, you know, I was before and in terms of the compromise much better. So, yeah, but I think the area of communication is something that I certainly personally need to continue to work on. And just in terms of that thing on communication, because, you know, if I look at the recent statistics, I think, you know, through the COVID, period, relationship breakdown has accelerated, and I think year on year, it's close to double, I think, you know, where it was, this time last year. And, you know, there's obviously a lot to contribute to that, you know, there's a whole lot of stress that's going on with, you know, navigating through a pandemic and not having any experience of moving ourselves through it. And leaders never had an experience of navigating through it.

Ingrid Galloway:

learning experience for everyone. Yeah, yeah. So,

Anthony Hartcher:

just on that, there's a couple of parts of this question. Obviously, there's that element of stress related to COVID that is introduced into the relationship there's an element of financial pressures that have been introduced due to COVID. But the key one of the overarching one, is that communication because ultimately, you know, if you communicate where you're at how you're feeling, you know, through communication, you can work as a team and you know, navigate through problems and hardships. I mean, not always. But yeah, so really came to you to touch on This period of the pandemic, and you know, relationships experiencing hardship. And just what tips can you give couples that are experiencing some hardship during these times? You know, around that communication, that compromise elements?

Ingrid Galloway:

Yeah, definitely. Well, I have a 14 day video series that you can download from my website, I created the 14 Day videos during COVID lockdown knowing in my heart that a lot of couples will be challenged during this time, right? And now that we're no longer in isolation, I bet you the tips are still useful as a daily guy. So right now I will share you three tips you can start with and then you can download from my website progressed. Number one, we've been talking about communication, right? Number one is humour. All right, when you communicate something with such I'm struggle and anger all the time, you know, of course, you're going to be more stressful. But if you speak from the point of, you know, being light hearted, of being humorous, it just changed the energy straightaway. Alright, so I recommend you to take a break from your work or your source of stress and lighten up your spirit by watching a comedy show, for example, you know, their language is the same Yes, maybe they're joking about COVID as well. But you know, in a light hearted way, and they joke about everything, about everything, and you can go out or you can bring popcorn to survey you don't have to go out and just bring popcorn to your sofa and watch it in front of your TV or iPad, but do it together. So you lighten up your spirits together. Number two, we've been talking about communication. This is very important. reframing your words and seeing opportunities. For example, you can say, because of COVID, I lost my job. Stressful, right? But if you reframe it like this, because of COVID I have time to chase my dreams, because all you have is time. Right? Isn't it better? I'll give you another example. That is close to my heart, right? Because of COVID. I lost a four Auntie's true story. I lost four Auntie's in three weeks, between March and April because of COVID. But if I reframe it like this, because of COVID, we have the financial opportunity to buy our first home together. It started with something negative, but then you balance it out with something positive. So to resolve your you are emotionally balanced. So not very, very charged negatively. Not very, very charged positively. But it's more balanced. And that's what we like. And then number three, just quickly mentioned to you that communication is one of the top three factors of relationship breakup. What are the other two factors money, and the other factor is infidelity. So my tip number three is sexual pleasure squeezing a quickie. After a hard day at work, you know, whether you're working from home or you're working outside, would it be nice to reward yourself with something pleasurable? See your partner don't look elsewhere? You know, just do it here. Go for it. You know? Those are my three tips.

Anthony Hartcher:

Fantastic, Ingrid. Yeah, I really think they're practical I tip so I you know, I really liked the practical element of what you do. Is there some other tips in terms of that every day so that, you know, you mentioned that spontaneity around, you know, getting romantic and, you know, enjoying one another's company? And, you know, is there anything else that people should be looking at to do on a daily basis, you know, life you know, from a health perspective, we always encourage people to get out and move their bodies. You know, to eat well, to take some time out. So from a relationship point of view, what should they be putting in their diary?

Ingrid Galloway:

Um, I definitely recommend walking if they're not into like hardcore exercise. Definitely. Number one, I recommend exercise but if they're not into hardcore exercise, why don't you walk around the block, you know, walk to a Zen environment like the beach or The lake or the park around you, you know, instead of say if you're single, instead of walking to your fridge over and over again, like, Who are you going to meet really person last times of meeting new people potential new partner, if you keep going to your fridge, go out and walk around the block or go to the beach or something there, you have more chance to meet new people.

Anthony Hartcher:

And I guess from a couple perspective, that's a great opportunity to spend some time together. And when you're exercising, you know how you mentioned that element of humour into the relationship and you know, finding an environment that's going to induce that humour, then getting out in nature relaxes you takes the stress, you know, winds, the stress down enables you to have more effective communication, and at the same time moving your body and so you know, you're doing that is that healthy relationships, healthy body? It's, you know, it's a fantastic combination. Definitely. In terms of the other side of relationships, so, you know, we're, you know, we've just spoken about how to keep a relationship together, and we'd sort of touched a bit on how to find someone or meet someone, but we'll, we'll go into that probably a bit more detail later on. But this next question is in relation to a relationship, you know, during COVID, it's heading downward. And, you know, is there some tips to reigniting that spark? When it's really sort of hitting rock bottom? What would you recommend couples to do in that situation?

Ingrid Galloway:

Definitely ask for professional help. Yes, don't suffer alone. Definitely don't suffer alone. And don't be a ashamed to ask for help. I mean, this is the the thing with relationship coaching work, is if you if you have a business, and your business is failing, or kind of failing, it's easy for you to engage with a business coach, you know, you know, to ask for help. So then your business goes higher and healthier. But if it's relationship, I don't know why it's just so personal, there's, there's a shame or guilt factor of asking for professional help, when it's about your relationship, I don't know why people need to, you know, change this mindset. So yeah, my tip will be asked for professional help get one on one coaching, or counselling, or go for a treat to hear sometimes you just have to remove yourself from the environment that is not very healthy, sometimes moving away from the stressful environment actually can help.

Anthony Hartcher:

And, you know, in some circumstances, you know, relationship staying together for the sake of just keeping face amongst society or for the children or whatever. But the relationship can be really toxic. And, you know, they've been down the path of getting some, you know, help and it's just not resolving or, you know, not helping the situation. Is there a guide or some tips around in a healthy breaker, you know, how can couples go about doing this in the right, and an amicable way where both parties are mutually better off? Yeah,

Ingrid Galloway:

definitely. Um, the healthy Guide to Healthy breakup is, you know, I understand that whether you are the dumper or the Dumpy have an unsuccessful relationship, it's painful. And there's always an element of hardship and emotional turmoil involved, right? When you are in a marriage, and you have children, especially with your partner, if you're just the two of you, and there are no kids involved, it's easier. But when there's kids involved, there are bigger things at play. You know, a broken heart is one thing, but the logistics of separation is a whole different heartbreak in itself, especially if kids are involved. So something that can help you in a more practical sense is researching and discovering your options. My suggestion will be if you can somehow play down the emotional roller, emotional roller coaster and think more logically, yeah, instead of being so angry, frustrated, just venting out not thinking clearly. If you can be a bit more logical and have the mindset of you know, what's the best outcome for mum, dad and the kids. You are on to an easier uncoupling. Journey, I call it uncoupling. I just like that term. So I recommend hiring a divorce coach, yes, there is such thing. There's a business coach, but there's also a divorce coach, and a mediator, a family lawyer, and avoid going to court as much as possible. If you need connection to those people, no worries, I can refer you to some good ones. Because the court journey is long, arduous, very stressful, physically, emotionally, mentally, and financially. You know, if you are not a multimillionaire, think again about going to court this can drag on for years, you know, I'm so the dynamic of parents that don't get along with each other, after their breakup will damage the children's future. So if you have kids, and you're breaking up, please consider this. It is not healthy to stay in a toxic relationship for the sake of your kids. But also, it's not healthy, to not get along after you break up for because it will be damaging for your kids. Growth and future. Yeah. After that, if you can hire a relationship coach to help you heal from the heartbreak, yeah, so to help you with the emotional mental side of things, especially if you want to be open to love again, right? Because you don't want to repeat the same mistakes that you've made in the past and start learning from your experience. There's hope, there's definitely hope you have learned to communicate better. I mean, you're always 10 out of 10. So in terms of the commitment department, but communication, you have learned to be better in compromise, you have learned to be better. So yeah, there's definitely hope.

Anthony Hartcher:

Absolutely, always hope and, you know, we always want to learn from our previous mistakes, and if we're not accepting that we've made mistakes, and how can you ever learn from what's happens. So I really like that suggestion that you said, the best way to do it is, you know, applying logic and really that, you know, accessing that creative part of our brain. And that's not assessable when we're highly stressed, highly emotional in that fight or flight mode. And given that you're the chief relaxation officer, haven't really keen to hear your tips on how people in these times have, you know, well, it's uncharted territory, and that, you know, for some relationships, and there's a lot of turmoil going on a lot of yelling and screaming, and just no communication. Essentially, it's all emotional, and anger and frustration. How can what are some techniques that someone can rather than fly off the handle or just be able to, you know, down regulate that stress, get into that more creative, logical discussion mode?

Ingrid Galloway:

I go, before you say anything, like angry or volatile, just pointing blame to your partner, ex partner. If you can go through this three gates, three gates, ask yourself, Is it true? Is it beneficial? Is it kind, I know that you just want to kill your partner or your ex right now. But if you can pause for the moment and ask yourself, Is it true that you are accusing? Or angry about? Is it beneficial for the outcome of the thing? And is it kind because you want to practice especially if your kids can see it? You want to practice kindness, even though this human being has cheated on you or just you just want to kill this person? Yeah.

Anthony Hartcher:

I love that tip of pausing. Because often we can just react and that's when our, you know, adrenals are flying and yeah, if we can just hold ourselves compose ourselves, you know, pause for that moment of time, you know, take some deep breaths, and then

Ingrid Galloway:

very important, yes, really? Yeah.

Anthony Hartcher:

So that's really helpful. Ingrid. I just, you know, we touched on before you mentioned, you know, for if you're single and you want to get out and find your love, there's no point of just walking up off the couch to the TV, you know, TV, TV or to the fridge. You might as well get outside do some, you know, do a walk outside. What are some other great tips for those that are single listening to find their true love?

Ingrid Galloway:

Number one is work on yourself. First, because finding love is 90%, about you and 10% about the other person, yes. If you haven't worked on yourself, then you will attract the wrong kind of person. Or you will attract another lesson that you need to learn from, you know, whoever you attract, it's a lesson for you, you know, doing maybe mirroring you. Say, if you're an angry self, you haven't work on your anger, then you will attract that angry partner. So then you can learn from from this from yourself, actually, because they are mirroring you. Yeah. So work on yourself, heal yourself, and engage with a relationship coach or counsellor, whoever that you choose, you know, to do that inner work first, and then go out there. Because that 10% That other person is not going to complete you completely. You're already lovable, you're already complete yourself. They're just going to add, you know, a more wonderful ingredients to your life, you know, but your dish is already yummy. Your dish is already yummy. It's just another sprinkle of I don't know rice sprinkle or, or some flakes of lavender to make it prettier, or something like that, you know what I mean?

Anthony Hartcher:

Absolutely. I love language. That's great. I resonate with what you're saying, because I, I went on that personal development journey post relationship breakdown. So the relationship broke down. And then I thought, now, you know, I've got to tell you, I've got to learn something from this. And so then I went through all this self discovery and did all the self help books and Anthony Robbins courses and, and that really, it did help me greatly for the relationship. I mean, today, you know, not only finding my dream love, but also being able to do much better as a, you know, as a partner, you know, be much better partner, much better husband now, you know, improving father constantly improving father, but that, that, that that was the key for me was absolutely, I didn't work on myself prior to the first relationship. And I did all my learning post. So I think that's a really good

Ingrid Galloway:

learning. time around, we're in areas, you know, 60% marriage Braille down for summer, I understand that.

Anthony Hartcher:

Just in terms of, you know, couples that, you know, resonated with your message today, and you know, your way of thinking about how to reignite that spark or you know, how to, you know, basically stay together and have a more fruitful, more romantic, more blissful relationship? How can couples or singles out there get in touch with you in terms of some further help and support you mentioned, you know, of course that you've, you've got uploaded on your website? How else can people best contact?

Ingrid Galloway:

Definitely, you can go to my website, www.kahyangan.com.au. That's KHYANG a n. Because my, my business thing, it is quite unique. Um, you can request a free chat with me so we can find out whether we're good to work together or not, because I don't suit everyone. I know I'm quite direct, but I'm fun. You know, well, if you want a coach that is quite fun, and not always in the drudgery of things. Hey, I'm here. And also, you can like my facebook coach. So facebook.com/ kahyangan.com-k&nrelationshipcoaching so you can follow me there as well.

Anthony Hartcher:

Fantastic. And I'll put the links down in the show notes. When I upload this so you know, people can have those direct links to your Facebook and website. Ingrid, just if you do have do you have any words of wisdom that we haven't covered off that you'd like to share with the listeners and viewers today?

Ingrid Galloway:

No, um, I will say last words. Don't suffer alone. really forget about the guilt and the shame. Just ask for help. Don't be afraid to ask for help and be the best happiest version of yourself.

Anthony Hartcher:

Fantastic. Ingrid. Thanks so much for sharing your wisdom and experience with the listeners viewers today. For listeners viewers if you like this episode, please like and share us with your friends that also may benefit the more we can get this message out to support others. Please share it amongst your friends that could benefit Stay tuned for more insightful episodes of me and my health bye for now thank you